How to Participate In Office Politics: And Win

The term “office politics” undoubtedly has a negative connotation. But should it? Office politics doesn’t necessarily mean “backstabbing your co-workers” or kissing up to a superior. Often, it might mean something as simple as demonstrating yourself to be qualified to enter a position that would be mutually beneficial for yourself and the company as a whole. Learn how to play the game: and win!

 

Speak Up (For yourself)

 

One of the major things holding people back in business is also one of the easiest to correct. It’s super easy for people to not draw attention to themselves in an office, but when you accomplish something, it’s important to tactfully promote yourself. Don’t let other people take credit for your accomplishments, either: unfortunately, that irritating practice is extremely common in many organizations. Although this may seem like I’m telling you to brag, you’re really not: you’re standing up for an extremely important person (which is, of course, yourself.)

 

Show Up (For Your Coworkers)

 

Making yourself useful is always a good policy. If your bosses see you as a person who’s not only reliable, but willing to take on additional responsibilities to help out, they’ll be extremely hesitant to exclude you from any future plans the company may have. Of course, you don’t want to let your own responsibilities fall by the wayside. Balance is key; be willing to help out but never put yourself at risk of being known as a person who doesn’t get their own work done.

 

Shut Up (The Negativity)

 

Gossip is so tempting to engage in, isn’t it! Even the best people on Earth probably get tempted to gossip about something or someone. However, if you’re serious about getting ahead in a company, you cannot let yourself be drawn into negativity and gossip. If you take the high road, superiors will eventually see you for what you are: a person with the maturity to be a leader in the company. And besides, it’s just a good way to live your life.

 

I’m Jessica Cox, and whether it’s in business or at home, I want people to overcome obstacles and live their best possible life. Being born without arms has helped me develop some adaptation and determination strategies that you can use today. If you want me to come share my story with the attendees at your convention or religious gathering, please contact me at requests@rightfooted.com.